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Tuesday, 29 July 2008

Argentina Down Improved Japan

A much improved performance by Japan's U-23s saw them give their Argentinean competitors a decent game, but failing to register on the scoresheet. The Japan Times has this good, if overly optimistic, report of the game.

Yes, Japan were much improved and generally held their own in midfield and defence. This was partly helped by Argentina's tendency to try and walk the ball into the net. However, Japan did not really look like
scoring and seem set to emulate the full national team's performance at France 98, giving a good impression of themselves, while failing to get results. The teams certainly has potential to do well in Beijing, but that has been true for a couple of years now and they still not appear to have a coherent strategy or style. Still, it was a much better display than against Australia on Saturday.

3 comments:

Alan said...

I only saw the 2nd half - wasn't too bad - what came out of the game for me, unfortunately, was the fact that Argentina still took any chance they could to hurt the opposition illegally.... no change there - Yasuda, handed off point blank in front of the linesman after passing the ball - the Argentinian probably a little frustrated that Yasuda beat him and as he turned shove his hand into the face of Yasuda.

Then, a few minutes later, a DISGRACEFUL deliberate (you can see the Aergentinian's face in the replay as he realises he's missed out, grits his teeth and gives it all his full strength) whack across the back of Nagatomu's legs took him out WAY after the ball had gone, again, Nagotomu got the ball away, the Argentinian got miffed and WHACK! Two red card offences in the space of two or three minutes. Did the referee choose to ignore them, not see them or not think they were worthy of action? Your guess is as good as mine.

Peter said...

Yeah, it was good but too much in the Sorimachi pattern. I'm sure
Sorimachi is a bright guy, but I just feel that in 90% of the games
there's not enough commitment to actually getting the ball into the net.
Sorimachi's too scared of failure.

There was one beautiful goal against Australia, built up by Uchida,
brilliantly assisted on by Morimoto and taken with aplomb by Kagawa.
The second goal was a lucky one with the Aussie goalie (poor
throughout) deceived by the flight and allowing it to spin into the
net when he could have saved it.

I disagree with Mark about this being like France in 1998. Then
Japan was facing a genuine dearth of sharp strikers. This team is
packed with technical ability but used too pedestrianly and
cautiously by Sorimachi.

I could cry watching this ponderous man unable to use the bagful of
talent at his disposal. This team clearly has a lot of technical skill
at its fingertips (or toetips), but the strategy is wooden. A top-class
manager would have lead this team to a convincing win against
Australia, despite their resolution and promise, and would not have
failed to get in front against Argentina.

The players in this Japanese Olympic team are much better than they
look, but, unfortunately, Sorimachi lacks aggression and the killer
instinct, not to mention flare. As a result, the team is no better than
the sum of its parts. I hope Sorimachi can prove me wrong in Beijing,
but so far I am underwhelmed by his timidity. For God's sake, Yasuharu, let those boys go for it! Let them loose and they will create mayhem!

Peter said...

Yeah, it was good but too much in the Sorimachi pattern. I'm sure Sorimachi is a bright guy, but I just feel that in 90% of the games there's not enough commitment to actually getting the ball into the net.
Sorimachi's too scared of failure.

There was one beautiful goal against Australia, built up by Uchida, brilliantly assisted on by Morimoto and taken with aplomb by Kagawa.
The second goal was a lucky one with the Aussie goalie (poor throughout) deceived by the flight and allowing it to spin into the net when he could have saved it.

I disagree with Mark about this being like France in 1998. Then Japan was facing a genuine dearth of sharp strikers. This team is packed with technical ability but used too pedestrianly and
cautiously by Sorimachi.

I could cry watching this ponderous man unable to use the bagful of talent at his disposal. This team clearly has a lot of technical skill at its fingertips (or toetips), but the strategy is wooden. A top-class
manager would have lead this team to a convincing win against Australia, despite their resolution and promise, and would not have failed to get in front against Argentina.

The players in this Japanese Olympic team are much better than they look, but, unfortunately, Sorimachi lacks aggression and the killer
instinct, not to mention flare. As a result, the team is no better than the sum of its parts. I hope Sorimachi can prove me wrong in Beijing,
but so far I am underwhelmed by his timidity. For God's sake, Yasuharu, let those boys go for it! Let them loose and they will create mayhem!